Tuesday, 09 August 2022 00:00

Peripheral neuropathy is a condition that primarily affects the nerves of the body by making you feel abnormal sensations or fail to feel sensations that you should be feeling. This condition can affect nerves throughout the body, but it can also affect the feet, which can be particularly uncomfortable. The nerve damage in the feet can make you feel a variety of symptoms. These symptoms might include a feeling of numbness in the feet, a “pins and needles” feeling, periodic shooting pains, and difficulty balancing on your feet, among many other things. Importantly, if you have neuropathy in your feet, it can be a good idea to take extra precautions for your feet. For example, check them regularly to ensure that they have not gotten an injury that you did not notice or feel. Also, you might consider being extra diligent about keeping them warm and well-covered during colder winter months, as neuropathy can interfere with the feet’s sensitivity to cold weather. If you or a loved one suffer from neuropathy in the feet, contact a podiatrist.

Neuropathy

Neuropathy can be a potentially serious condition, especially if it is left undiagnosed. If you have any concerns that you may be experiencing nerve loss in your feet, consult with the foot specialists from Podiatry Associates of Belleville. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment for neuropathy.

What Is Neuropathy?

Neuropathy is a condition that leads to damage to the nerves in the body. Peripheral neuropathy, or neuropathy that affects your peripheral nervous system, usually occurs in the feet. Neuropathy can be triggered by a number of different causes. Such causes include diabetes, infections, cancers, disorders, and toxic substances.

Symptoms of Neuropathy Include:

  • Numbness
  • Sensation loss
  • Prickling and tingling sensations
  • Throbbing, freezing, burning pains
  • Muscle weakness

Those with diabetes are at serious risk due to being unable to feel an ulcer on their feet. Diabetics usually also suffer from poor blood circulation. This can lead to the wound not healing, infections occurring, and the limb may have to be amputated.

Treatment

To treat neuropathy in the foot, podiatrists will first diagnose the cause of the neuropathy. Figuring out the underlying cause of the neuropathy will allow the podiatrist to prescribe the best treatment, whether it be caused by diabetes, toxic substance exposure, infection, etc. If the nerve has not died, then it’s possible that sensation may be able to return to the foot.

Pain medication may be issued for pain. Electrical nerve stimulation can be used to stimulate nerves. If the neuropathy is caused from pressure on the nerves, then surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Belleville, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Friday, 05 August 2022 00:00

Have you noticed a bony protrusion on the side of your big toe? If so, you may have developed the foot condition known as a bunion. Don't let bunions interfere with your daily activities.

Tuesday, 02 August 2022 00:00

Most babies do not wear shoes until they begin to walk comfortably. As the toes grip the floor, the bones, tendons, muscles and ligaments in each foot can become stronger. It is important that the toes have enough room in the socks to move freely, and are not stretched too tight over the foot. Many people choose to have their child’s feet properly measured when purchasing their child's first pair of shoes. This is done by measuring the length and the width of each foot, which can help to determine the exact size shoe your child should wear. Shoes that fit properly have adequate room for the toes, and the heel should fit securely. If your child’s foot slips out of the shoe while walking, the next size smaller may be considered. Children’s feet grow fast, and it is beneficial to have them measured every four to six weeks. The rate the feet grow will slow down at approximately four years of age, and then generally increase one size per year until age twenty. If you would like additional information about what to look for before purchasing your child’s shoes, please confer with a podiatrist.

 

The health of a child’s feet is vital to their overall well-being. If you have any questions regarding foot health, contact the foot specialists of Podiatry Associates of Belleville. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Tips for Keeping Children's Feet Healthy

  • Make sure their shoes fit properly
  • Look for any signs of in-toeing or out-toeing
  • Check to see if they have Clubfoot (condition that affects your child’s foot and ankle, twisting the heel and toes inward) which is one of the most common nonmajor birth defects.
  • Lightly cover your baby’s feet (Tight covers may keep your baby from moving their feet freely, and could prevent normal development)
  • Allow your toddler to go shoeless (Shoes can be restricting for a young child’s foot)
  • Cut toenails straight across to avoid ingrown toenails
  • Keep your child’s foot clean and dry
  • Cover cuts and scrapes. Wash any scratches with soap and water and cover them with a bandage until they’ve healed.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Belleville, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 26 July 2022 00:00

Clubfoot is considered to be a congenital foot condition. The medical name for it is known as congenital talipes equinovarus, and the abbreviation is CTEV.  A noticeable sign of this condition is that the infant's feet are rotated at the ankle. There are two categories of CTEV - postural and structural. The former involves tightness or muscle imbalance, and the bones and joints are generally not affected by this type of clubfoot. The latter is a deformity that affects the bones and joints, and reaching a full range of motion may be difficult to accomplish. The symptoms that are associated with CTEV can consist of tight calf muscles, and the feet will turn inward. Research has indicated that genetics and environment may contribute to developing structural CTEV. When walking begins, the child may have difficulty in maintaining a normal walking pattern, and they may have foot pain and limited mobility. Specific stretches can possibly help postural CTEV, and surgery may be necessary in structural CTEV, which may help to properly align the feet. If your child has been born with clubfoot, it is strongly advised that a podiatrist be contacted who can diagnose and manage this condition.

 

Congenital foot problems require immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact the foot specialists of Podiatry Associates of Belleville. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Congenital foot problems are deformities affecting the feet, toes, and/or ankles that children are born with. Some of these conditions have a genetic cause while others just happen. Some specific foot ailments that children may be born with include clubfeet, polydactyly/macrodactyly, and cleft foot. There are several other foot anomalies that can occur congenitally. What all of these conditions have in common is that a child may experience difficulty walking or performing everyday activities, as well as trouble finding footwear that fits their foot deformity. Some of these conditions are more serious than others. Consulting with a podiatrist as early as possible will help in properly diagnosing a child’s foot condition while getting the necessary treatment underway.

What are Causes of Congenital Foot Problem?

A congenital foot problem is one that happens to a child at birth. These conditions can be caused by a genetic predisposition, developmental or positional abnormalities during gestation, or with no known cause.

What are Symptoms of Congenital Foot Problems?

Symptoms vary by the congenital condition. Symptoms may consist of the following:

  • Clubfoot, where tendons are shortened, bones are shaped differently, and the Achilles tendon is tight, causing the foot to point in and down. It is also possible for the soles of the feet to face each other.
  • Polydactyly, which usually consists of a nubbin or small lump of tissue without a bone, a toe that is partially formed but has no joints, or an extra toe.
  • Vertical talus, where the talus bone forms in the wrong position causing other bones in the foot to line up improperly, the front of the foot to point up, and the bottom of the foot to stiffen, with no arch, and to curve out.
  • Tarsal coalition, when there is an abnormal connection of two or more bones in the foot leading to severe, rigid flatfoot.
  • Cleft foot, where there are missing toes, a V-shaped cleft, and other anatomical differences.
  • Macrodactyly, when the toes are abnormally large due to overgrowth of the underlying bone or soft tissue.

Treatment and Prevention

While there is nothing one can do to prevent congenital foot problems, raising awareness and receiving neonatal screenings are important. Early detection by taking your child to a podiatrist leads to the best outcome possible.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Belleville, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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